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  • May 20, 2015
  • 06:04 PM
  • 48 views

Tiny grains of lithium dramatically improve performance of fusion plasma

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While fusion might still be a far off dream, a new discovery may help bring that dream closer to reality. Scientists have discovered a phenomenon that helps them to improve fusion plasmas, a finding that could quicken the development of large scale fusion energy. The scientists found that when they injected tiny grains of lithium into a plasma undergoing a particular kind of turbulence then, under the right conditions, the temperature and pressure rose dramatically.... Read more »

Kaye, S., Abrams, T., Ahn, J., Allain, J., Andre, R., Andruczyk, D., Barchfeld, R., Battaglia, D., Bhattacharjee, A., Bedoya, F.... (2015) An overview of recent physics results from NSTX. Nuclear Fusion, 55(10), 104002. DOI: 10.1088/0029-5515/55/10/104002  

  • May 15, 2015
  • 10:03 AM
  • 66 views

Nature's natural fix to the ticking carbon time bomb in the peatlands

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Peatlands have long been seen as a dangerous store of carbon that could be released as glaciers melt and temperatures increase. But new research suggests Nature has some natural adaptations at hand to prevent such a release from occurring!... Read more »

  • May 11, 2015
  • 06:15 AM
  • 85 views

Ending A Relationship: Slow Fade Or Sudden Death?

by Kate Blanchfield in United Academics

Of two network breakdown models, researchers find ‘link deletion’ to be most common.... Read more »

Yohsuke Murase, Hang-Hyun Jo, János Török, János Kertész, & Kimmo Kaski. (2015) Modeling the role of relationship fading and breakup in social network formation. arXiv. arXiv: 1505.00644v1

  • May 8, 2015
  • 04:01 PM
  • 95 views

To Zoom In, Bats Say "Ahh!"

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



In the future when touch screens are obsolete and we control our devices by facial gesture, maybe we'll zoom in and out the same way a bat does it. We'll open our mouths wide to narrow our field of focus. To see the bigger picture, we'll purse our lips tightly. But while we'll only be reading the news or shopping online, bats are operating one of the coolest sensory systems owned by a mammal.

An Italian priest, Lazzaro Spallanzani, sent blindfolded bats through obstacle courses in the lat... Read more »

Kounitsky P, Rydell J, Amichai E, Boonman A, Eitan O, Weiss AJ, & Yovel Y. (2015) Bats adjust their mouth gape to zoom their biosonar field of view. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25941395  

  • May 8, 2015
  • 07:56 AM
  • 97 views

MPs with Science Degrees: How did Science & Technology do in the UK General Election 2015?

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

In case you missed it, the people of the United Kingdom just elected 650 Members of Parliament (MPs) to run their government for the next give years. How many of these newly elected MPs have science backgrounds? Like many, I was inspired by Mark Henderson’s book The Geek Manifesto [1] back in 2012 after reading an article which argued that (quote) “with just one British MP having a scientific background, the people who run the country clearly need some expert advice”. So when I........ Read more »

  • May 7, 2015
  • 05:46 PM
  • 109 views

What you need to know about the newly proposed science funding legislation

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

The House Science Committee, chaired by Lamar Smith, unveiled their new science budget last week. Read on to see what it proposes and what it means for science.... Read more »

  • May 5, 2015
  • 12:38 PM
  • 113 views

3 Reasons Octopus Locomotion Is the Weirdest

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Of course there's nothing ordinary about an octopus. It's the animal that showed us spinelessness doesn't have to mean a lack of smarts. But when researchers brought some octopuses into the lab to study exactly how the animals move, their findings were bizarre—both predictably and unpredictably.

Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem studied nine common octopuses (Octopus vulgaris) that fishers had scooped out of the ocean for them. Once the animals got comfortable in the lab, t........ Read more »

  • May 4, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 121 views

this is your brain on cosmic rays

by Greg Fish in weird things

Back in the day, I argued that if we were going to get serious about space exploration, we also had to budget for large, luxury spacecraft rather than just capsules in which we would cram the brave men and women we’d be sending to other worlds with a pat on the back for agreeing to deal with the discomfort and damage to their bodies. Among the reasons listed were the basic physiological problems of spending many months in zero gravity, and mental health hazards of boredom and cabin fever. ........ Read more »

Vipan K. Parihar, Barrett Allen, Katherine K. Tran, Trisha G. Macaraeg, Esther M. Chu, Stephanie F. Kwok, Nicole N. Chmielewski, Brianna M. Craver, Janet E. Baulch, Munjal M. Acharya, Francis A. Cucinotta, & Charles L. Limoli. (2015) What happens to your brain on the way to Mars. Science Advances, 1(4). info:/10.1126/sciadv.1400256

  • May 1, 2015
  • 12:08 AM
  • 117 views

Eyes on Environment: the search for artificial photosynthesis

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

How can we mimic plant photosynthesis to move to a fossil-free economy? Read here to find out!... Read more »

Sun, K., Saadi, F., Lichterman, M., Hale, W., Wang, H., Zhou, X., Plymale, N., Omelchenko, S., He, J., Papadantonakis, K.... (2015) Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201423034. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1423034112  

  • April 29, 2015
  • 06:00 AM
  • 138 views

Where Are All The Galaxy-Harvesting Alien Civilizations At?

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

The alien civilizations we search might be too advanced to be found.
... Read more »

  • April 27, 2015
  • 12:28 PM
  • 132 views

Boron and the Permian extinction: a glimpse into the past gives a hint of the future

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

How will ocean acidification from anthropogenic CO2 emissions affect marine life? Recent work studying a similar time during the Permian extinction 200 million years ago gives a clue.... Read more »

Clarkson MO, Kasemann SA, Wood RA, Lenton TM, Daines SJ, Richoz S, Ohnemueller F, Meixner A, Poulton SW, & Tipper ET. (2015) Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction. Science (New York, N.Y.), 348(6231), 229-32. PMID: 25859043  

  • April 25, 2015
  • 11:53 AM
  • 151 views

NASA and warp drive: An update

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

There is some excitement in the net about some news of Harold White’s experiment at NASA. I have uncovered it by chance at a forum. This is a well-frequented site with people at NASA posting on it and regularly updating about the work that they are carrying out. You can also have noticed some activity […]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2005) Strong coupling expansion for general relativity. Int.J.Mod.Phys.D15:1373-1386,2006. arXiv: hep-th/0508246v3

  • April 24, 2015
  • 01:55 PM
  • 147 views

Hubble's 25th anniversary

by Perikis Livas in Chilon

Δεδομένης της ολοκλήρωσης των 25 χρόνων λειτουργίας του, παρουσιάζονται μερικές από τις σημαντ&iota........ Read more »

Periklis D. Livas. (2015) Hubble's 25th anniversary. Chilon. info:/

  • April 23, 2015
  • 10:35 AM
  • 121 views

of microwave noodles and extragalactic signals

by Greg Fish in weird things

FRBs just can’t seem to catch a break this month. First, they were an alien signal. Then just as quickly as they were attributed to aliens because the Daily Fail decided to get creative with two out of context words and no one seemed to bother to fact check them, the bursts were called a false signal caused by microwave interference. Not just any microwave interference mind you, but the kind in which you warm up leftovers [...]... Read more »

E. Petroff, E. F. Keane, E. D. Barr, J. E. Reynolds, J. Sarkissian, P. G. Edwards, J. Stevens, C. Brem, A. Jameson, S. Burke-Spolaor.... (2015) Identifying the source of perytons at the Parkes radio telescope. n/a. arXiv: 1504.02165v1

  • April 22, 2015
  • 12:29 PM
  • 110 views

Microwave goodbye to inefficient spintronic microwave detectors

by Bryn Howells in Spin and Tonic

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) which comprise of a free magnetic layer (whose magnetization orientation can be manipulated) and a fixed magnetic layer (whose magnetization is...
The post Microwave goodbye to inefficient spintronic microwave detectors appeared first on Spin and Tonic.
... Read more »

  • April 22, 2015
  • 11:42 AM
  • 126 views

Earth Day spotlight: a survey of the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Five years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill changed the trajectory of ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. We take a look at how species have been affected and what we can do to prevent another disaster.... Read more »

Cornwall W. (2015) Deepwater Horizon: after the oil. Science (New York, N.Y.), 348(6230), 22. PMID: 25838362  

  • April 22, 2015
  • 08:03 AM
  • 114 views

why the great void didn’t cause the cold spot

by Greg Fish in weird things

Remember the anomalous Cold Spot, the bizarre, low temperature area spotted in the maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation, or CMBR for short, the echo the Big Bang which gives us a very high level overview of the structure of our universe? Cosmologists bristled at an anomaly stretching some 1.8 billion light years and seemingly violating what we thought was a universal rule [...]... Read more »

Szapudi, I., Kovacs, A., Granett, B., Frei, Z., Silk, J., Burgett, W., Cole, S., Draper, P., Farrow, D., Kaiser, N.... (2015) Detection of a supervoid aligned with the cold spot of the cosmic microwave background. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 450(1), 288-294. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv488  

  • April 21, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 96 views

peeking at dark matter during a tidal strip show

by Greg Fish in weird things

Dark matter is a substance that makes up nearly all mass in the universe, but decades after we discovered it, all we have are indirect measurements which show us that it’s there in very large amounts, forming galactic halos, but ultimately, little else. It doesn’t seem to interact with any of the stuff that makes stars, dust, and planets, it emits or reflects no radiation, and this utter lack of interesting properties we could study [...]... Read more »

Massey, R., Williams, L., Smit, R., Swinbank, M., Kitching, T., Harvey, D., Jauzac, M., Israel, H., Clowe, D., Edge, A.... (2015) The behaviour of dark matter associated with four bright cluster galaxies in the 10 kpc core of Abell 3827. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 449(4), 3393-3406. DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stv467  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 03:36 PM
  • 116 views

Black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While mass media was busy misquoting Stephen Hawking and arguing about black holes, astrophysicists have been hard at work trying to solve still unanswered questions about them. Now a team has not only proven that a supermassive black hole exists in a place where it isn’t supposed to be, but in doing so have opened a new door to what things were like in the early universe.... Read more »

Thomas J. Whalen, Ryan C. Hickox, Amy E. Reines, Jenny E. Greene, Gregory R. Sivakoff, Kelsey E. Johnson, David M. Alexander, & Andy D. Goulding. (2015) Variable Hard X-ray Emission from the Candidate Accreting Black Hole in Dwarf Galaxy Henize 2-10. The Astrophysical journal . arXiv: 1504.03331v1

  • April 17, 2015
  • 11:15 AM
  • 148 views

The downfall of coal: job trends in a changing energy landscape

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Coal jobs have decreased dramatically in the past seven years, but are renewable energy and natural gas jobs compensating? New policy work reveals the geographical patterns in job changes that do not bode well for coal-producing states.... Read more »

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