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  • July 30, 2014
  • 01:31 PM
  • 17 views

Suicide, it might be in the blood

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I tried to kill myself, more than once in fact. It was a troubling time for me and as a former active duty Marine that might not be too surprising […]... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 10:46 AM
  • 17 views

Influenza: How the Great War helped create the greatest pandemic the world has ever known | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

The Great War helped create the influenza pandemic of 1918, which eventually brought an early end to the Great War. Continue reading...... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 09:41 AM
  • 12 views

Video Tip of the Week: PhenDisco, “phenotype discoverer” for dbGap data

by Mary in OpenHelix

The dbGaP, database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, repository at NCBI collects information from research projects that link genotype and phenotype information and human variation, across many different types of studies, providing leads on variation that may be important to understand clinical issues. Some of the data is publicly available de-identified patient information, and some of the […]... Read more »

Doan Son, Lin Ko-Wei, Conway Mike, Ohno-Machado Lucila, Hsieh Alex, Feupe Stephanie Feudjio, Garland Asher, Ross Mindy K, Jiang Xiaoqian, & Farzaneh Seena. (2013) PhenDisco: phenotype discovery system for the database of genotypes and phenotypes. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA. PMID: 23989082  

Tryka K. A., A. Sturcke, Y. Jin, Z. Y. Wang, L. Ziyabari, M. Lee, N. Popova, N. Sharopova, M. Kimura, & M. Feolo. (2013) NCBI's Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes: dbGaP. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1211  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 54 views

Does Life Come In XXXS?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Is there a minimum size for life? How would you measure it, cell volume or genome size? People do both. The current minimum example of life is Mycoplasma genitalium, at just 200 nm by 600 nm in well-fed cultures. M. genitalium also has the smallest known genome for a free-living organism (520 genes, we have about 27,000). Some organisms have fewer genes (137 or so) but are endosymbionts, so they can get away with trashing some of their DNA. New research shows that M. genitalium is a pathogenic o........ Read more »

Manhart LE. (2013) Mycoplasma genitalium: An emergent sexually transmitted disease?. Infectious disease clinics of North America, 27(4), 779-92. PMID: 24275270  

Gibson DG, Glass JI, Lartigue C, Noskov VN, Chuang RY, Algire MA, Benders GA, Montague MG, Ma L, Moodie MM.... (2010) Creation of a bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5987), 52-6. PMID: 20488990  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 05:27 AM
  • 17 views

Subduing the Hive Mind: An enemy’s enemy could become an unlikely friend

by socgenmicro in Microbe Post

Leafcutter ants form some of the biggest, most remarkable animal societies on Earth, living in sprawling colonies of up to 8 million individuals. These ants harvest more greenery in South American rainforests than any other animal, consuming almost 20% of … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 04:52 AM
  • 16 views

Immunological effects from risperidone treatment in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The findings from Jai Eun Choi and colleagues [1] suggesting that use of the antipsychotic risperidone may impact on levels of certain cytokines - messenger cells of the immune system - in some cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) grabbed my attention recently. I've always been pretty interested in the complexity of the immune system when it comes to something like autism (see here) as well as the various examples of how many of the medications used to 'manage' aspects of autis........ Read more »

Choi JE, Widjaja F, Careaga M, Bent S, Ashwood P, & Hendren RL. (2014) Change in Plasma Cytokine Levels During Risperidone Treatment in Children with Autism. Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology. PMID: 24828014  

  • July 29, 2014
  • 01:15 PM
  • 43 views

Can’t Handle the Stress? Blame your Brain

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Do you rise to the occasion, or do you fold under the pressure? No matter which side of the fence you’re, you can thank [or blame] your brain. Some people […]... Read more »

  • July 29, 2014
  • 12:02 PM
  • 37 views

When Mom and Dad Have Different Migratory Routes, Kids Fly Right Down the Middle

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

It sounds like the setup to a bad joke told by zoologists: What do you get when you cross a bird that always flies to the west with one that always flies east? But the punch line is weirder than you’d guess. Birds’ migratory routes are partly coded into their DNA. A baby that inherits […]The post When Mom and Dad Have Different Migratory Routes, Kids Fly Right Down the Middle appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 34 views

Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Coronavirus, Autophagy, and the ER stress response

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen induces a stress response commonly known as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) or ER stress response, an adaptive signalling pathway increasing the expression of ER chaperones, inhibiting mRNA translation, and stimulating ER associated degradation (ERAD) of accumulated proteins. The degradation via the ERAD pathway in particular requires the formation of double membrane vesicles -more commonly referred to as autophagosomes - which subsequen........ Read more »

Rzymski T, Milani M, Pike L, Buffa F, Mellor HR, Winchester L, Pires I, Hammond E, Ragoussis I, & Harris AL. (2010) Regulation of autophagy by ATF4 in response to severe hypoxia. Oncogene, 29(31), 4424-35. PMID: 20514020  

Li JK, Liang JJ, Liao CL, & Lin YL. (2012) Autophagy is involved in the early step of Japanese encephalitis virus infection. Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur, 14(2), 159-68. PMID: 21946213  

Cottam EM, Whelband MC, & Wileman T. (2014) Coronavirus NSP6 restricts autophagosome expansion. Autophagy, 10(8). PMID: 24991833  

  • July 29, 2014
  • 10:37 AM
  • 20 views

STING-associated autoinflammatory disease

by Aurelie in The Immuno Blog

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine describes an autoinflammatory syndrome associated with mutations in the gene encoding STING. Dubbed SAVI, for STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy, the disease is characterized by systemic inflammation, severe cutaneous … Continue reading →... Read more »

Liu, Y., Jesus, A., Marrero, B., Yang, D., Ramsey, S., Sanchez, G., Tenbrock, K., Wittkowski, H., Jones, O., Kuehn, H.... (2014) Activated STING in a Vascular and Pulmonary Syndrome. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1312625  

  • July 29, 2014
  • 07:30 AM
  • 34 views

Is homosexuality "natural"?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

In the beginning, there was no sex. That’s because in the beginning, there was no Barry White. A playful look at examples of homosexuality in nature.... Read more »

Van Houdenhove E, Gijs L, T'sjoen G, & Enzlin P. (2014) Asexuality: A Multidimensional Approach. Journal of sex research, 1-10. PMID: 24750031  

  • July 29, 2014
  • 04:04 AM
  • 35 views

Ketogenic diet and the valproate mouse model of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A brief entry today and yet another blog post that starts with a quote (sorry)... "The offspring exposed to VPA [valproic acid] prenatally demonstrated a significant decrease in the number of play initiations/attacks and this was reversed with the KD [ketogenic diet]".Gloucester Old Spot @ Wikipedia That finding reported in the paper by Ahn and colleagues [1] continues my interest in all-things related to prenatal VPA exposure and the reported effects on some offspring (........ Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 03:10 PM
  • 119 views

This Month In Blastocystis Research (JUL 2014)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

A new study from Colombia sees Blastocystis as a quasi-ubiquitous organism.... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 01:13 PM
  • 45 views

A New Hepatitis C Treatment offers Hope

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Well this might seem weird, but today is world hepatitis day. I guess I should qualify weird with the fact that it’s only weird because no one really knows. What […]... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 07:45 AM
  • 52 views

Plastic bags responsible for outrageous lack of cute pink piglets

by Stephanie Swift in mmmbitesizescience

Most of us now subscribe to the idea that plastic bags are bad for the environment. Hence, droves of people turn up at their local supermarket with a sturdy jute bag in tow. Now, there’s evidence that the items that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 28, 2014
  • 04:24 AM
  • 80 views

Prenatal and neonatal blood mercury levels and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Acknowledging that some topics have the ability to furrow brows when it comes to autism research, mercury and autism is becoming something of a frequent talking point on this blog as a function of a whole slew of articles appearing in the peer-reviewed domain. If I were to [very tentatively] summarise the collected literature so far, it would be to say something like:Mosaic of mercury @ Wikipedia (i) there is quite a bit more research to be done on some sources of mercury being 'l........ Read more »

Yau VM, Green PG, Alaimo CP, Yoshida CK, Lutsky M, Windham GC, Delorenze G, Kharrazi M, Grether JK, & Croen LA. (2014) Prenatal and neonatal peripheral blood mercury levels and autism spectrum disorders. Environmental research, 294-303. PMID: 24981828  

  • July 26, 2014
  • 01:18 PM
  • 125 views

Save the Neurons: Fighting the Effects of Parkinsons

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Possibly one of the most famous cases of parkinson’s is Michael J. Fox. More than just the “shakes” parkinson’s can cause a whole host of other problems mentally and physically […]... Read more »

  • July 25, 2014
  • 05:39 PM
  • 153 views

Small Things, Big Problem: Microplastics Uptake in Shore Crabs

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Lately I've been gearing up for some nano-particle research, and so I've been doing a lot of reading about very small things. While perusing the literature, I came across a paper published online in Environmental Science and Technology that takes a look at microplastics.Let’s start with the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a very good example of this type of marine pollution. This huge collection of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean is created by an ocean gyre, a stable circular ocean curre........ Read more »

Watts AJ, Lewis C, Goodhead RM, Beckett SJ, Moger J, Tyler CR, & Galloway TS. (2014) Uptake and Retention of Microplastics by the Shore Crab Carcinus maenas. Environmental science . PMID: 24972075  

  • July 25, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 129 views

Fighting the Obesity Epidemic with X-box [No, not that one]

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Despite all the efforts, people are losing the war on obesity. There is probably a number of factors involved, genetics, underlying medical problems, most of all diet, but in any […]... Read more »

Williams KW, Liu T, Kong X, Fukuda M, Deng Y, Berglund ED, Deng Z, Gao Y, Liu T, Sohn JW.... (2014) Xbp1s in Pomc Neurons Connects ER Stress with Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis. Cell metabolism. PMID: 25017942  

  • July 25, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 139 views

The Friday Five 07/25/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Five of the coolest news stories from the past week... Read more »

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