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  • July 31, 2014
  • 01:33 PM
  • 8 views

Mitochondria and Anti Aging

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I’m sure you can all relate, you go to fix the sink and in the process you build a new kitchen on accident. Anyone… no? Well that is sort of […]... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 09:22 AM
  • 9 views

What’s the Answer? (electronic lab notebooks)

by Mary in OpenHelix

Biostars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at Biostars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Voegele C., N. Robinot, J. McKay, P. Damiecki, & L. Alteyrac. (2013) A universal open-source Electronic Laboratory Notebook. Bioinformatics, 29(13), 1710-1712. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btt253  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:39 AM
  • 12 views

3-D Nanostructure Could Efficiently Store Gas

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at at Rice University predict functional advantages of a three-dimensional porous nanostructure that could benefit gas storage, nanoelectronics, and composite materials that perform multiple functions.... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 14 views

Tough Talking Apes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The new Planet of the Apes movie has talking apes! In the old Charleton Heston versions, the apes had thousands of years to evolve speech capabilities, but Dawn of the Planet of the Apes takes place only 10 years after their escape from the lab. Anatomical differences between human and ape hyoid position, rib musculature and tongue show us why speech is not possible for Cesar and his friends. In addition, new research points out the importance of the foxp2 protein for speech and auditory functio........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 9 views

July 31, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Do you ever feel nostalgic for a specific paper? Maybe this paper inspired your own research, or maybe it was a paper you immediately knew would be game-changing. Maybe, like today’s TBT paper, it was a great paper about solidly executed research with a memorable giggle-inducing technique. Thanks to a nostalgic HighMag reader and friend, Omar Quintero, we are being re-introduced to gonad sandwiches. In mammals, sex determination refers to the changes during early development that lead ........ Read more »

Martineau, J., Nordqvist, K., Tilmann, C., Lovell-Badge, R., & Capel, B. (1997) Male-specific cell migration into the developing gonad. Current Biology, 7(12), 958-968. DOI: 10.1016/S0960-9822(06)00415-5  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 05:31 AM
  • 18 views

The voices heard by people with schizophrenia are friendlier in India and Africa, than in the US

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

When a patient with schizophrenia hears voices in their head, is the experience shaped by the culture they live in? Tanya Luhrmann and her colleagues investigated by interviewing twenty people diagnosed with schizophrenia living in San Mateo, California; twenty in Accra, Ghana; and twenty others in Chennai India. There were similarities across cultures, including descriptions of good and bad voices, but also striking differences.In San Mateo the interviewees talked about their condition as a bra........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 04:18 AM
  • 12 views

Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV and autism: supporting opioid-excess?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Serum levels of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV were found to be lower in children with autism compared to asymptomatic controls according to the study by Shahid Bashira & Laila AL-Ayadhi [1]. Based on analysis by ELISA, researchers concluded that "alterations in the plasma level of DPP IV play a role in the pathophysiology of autism".A sailor went to sea, sea, sea... @ Wikipedia Anyone who has followed the autism research scene for any length of time might have already heard ab........ Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:23 PM
  • 21 views

How the presence of a bilingual school changes the linguistic profile of a community

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the great narratives of our time that the market will fix everything. In education this means that parental choice is assumed to improve education. Rather than the state supplying high-quality education, the neoliberal credo is that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clyne, Michael. (2005) Australia's Language Potential . Sydney, UNSW Press. . info:/

  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:48 PM
  • 15 views

Keeping lithium contained: new design allows for high energy-density anode in Li-ion batteries

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Researchers have found a way to limit volume expansion and prevent dendrite formation of all-lithium anodes. This promises to increase the energy density of Li-ion batteries!... Read more »

Zheng, G., Lee, S., Liang, Z., Lee, H., Yan, K., Yao, H., Wang, H., Li, W., Chu, S., & Cui, Y. (2014) Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes. Nature Nanotechnology. DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2014.152  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 04:00 PM
  • 8 views

SCIENCE IN THE NEWS: THE 2014 EBOLA OUTBREAK

by Emily Lawson in Antisense Science

If you’ve been watching the news recently, you’ll probably have seen reports on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Around 673 people in Guinea and Liberia have died so far (including one case of a Liberian government employee who died shortly after arriving at Lagos airport in Nigeria), making this the most deadly outbreak to date. So what exactly is Ebola, and why is it so deadly?

Ebola virus disease (EVD) has an incredibly high mortality rate – while the current outbreak h........ Read more »

Dixon MG, Schafer IJ, & EIS officer, CDC. (2014) Ebola viral disease outbreak - west Africa, 2014. MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, 63(25), 548-51. PMID: 24964881  

Gatherer, D. (2014) The 2014 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa. Journal of General Virology, 95(Pt_8), 1619-1624. DOI: 10.1099/vir.0.067199-0  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 01:31 PM
  • 33 views

Suicide, it might be in the blood

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I tried to kill myself, more than once in fact. It was a troubling time for me and as a former active duty Marine that might not be too surprising […]... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 11:24 AM
  • 22 views

Violent Death Rates Increased After Traumatic Brain Injury

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Anecdotal reports have linked traumatic brain injury with later violent death including death by suicide.Few large epidemiological studies have been published on this association.However, a recent Swedish population study published in JAMA Psychiatry provides valuable insight into this issue.Seena Fazel and colleagues from the University of Oxford, University College London and the Karolinksa Institute examined a large database of over 200,000 patients with TBI.Cases of TBI were identified from ........ Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 10:46 AM
  • 38 views

Influenza: How the Great War helped create the greatest pandemic the world has ever known | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

The Great War helped create the influenza pandemic of 1918, which eventually brought an early end to the Great War. Continue reading...... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 09:41 AM
  • 27 views

Video Tip of the Week: PhenDisco, “phenotype discoverer” for dbGap data

by Mary in OpenHelix

The dbGaP, database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, repository at NCBI collects information from research projects that link genotype and phenotype information and human variation, across many different types of studies, providing leads on variation that may be important to understand clinical issues. Some of the data is publicly available de-identified patient information, and some of the […]... Read more »

Doan Son, Lin Ko-Wei, Conway Mike, Ohno-Machado Lucila, Hsieh Alex, Feupe Stephanie Feudjio, Garland Asher, Ross Mindy K, Jiang Xiaoqian, & Farzaneh Seena. (2013) PhenDisco: phenotype discovery system for the database of genotypes and phenotypes. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA. PMID: 23989082  

Tryka K. A., A. Sturcke, Y. Jin, Z. Y. Wang, L. Ziyabari, M. Lee, N. Popova, N. Sharopova, M. Kimura, & M. Feolo. (2013) NCBI's Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes: dbGaP. Nucleic Acids Research, 42(D1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1211  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 09:19 AM
  • 32 views

Higher Implicit Self-Esteem Linked to Positive Evaluation of Spouses

by amikulak in Daily Observations

It’s often said that we can’t love others unless we love ourselves.  According to a new study, this may be true, but perhaps in a different way than we expect: […]... Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 23 views

The Attentive Look of a Dog in Training

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Researchers investigate the body language of a dog that is performing well in training.Photo: Markus Balint / ShutterstockA new study puts dogs through the first stage of a basic training task and analyzes eye contact and posture in the most successful dogs. The research by Masashi Hasegawa et al (Azabu University School of Veterinary Medicine) is motivated by a desire to improve people’s training abilities by helping them recognize the posture associated with successful learning. O........ Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 93 views

Does Life Come In XXXS?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Is there a minimum size for life? How would you measure it, cell volume or genome size? People do both. The current minimum example of life is Mycoplasma genitalium, at just 200 nm by 600 nm in well-fed cultures. M. genitalium also has the smallest known genome for a free-living organism (520 genes, we have about 27,000). Some organisms have fewer genes (137 or so) but are endosymbionts, so they can get away with trashing some of their DNA. New research shows that M. genitalium is a pathogenic o........ Read more »

Manhart LE. (2013) Mycoplasma genitalium: An emergent sexually transmitted disease?. Infectious disease clinics of North America, 27(4), 779-92. PMID: 24275270  

Gibson DG, Glass JI, Lartigue C, Noskov VN, Chuang RY, Algire MA, Benders GA, Montague MG, Ma L, Moodie MM.... (2010) Creation of a bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome. Science (New York, N.Y.), 329(5987), 52-6. PMID: 20488990  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 07:32 AM
  • 61 views

Potentially habitable exoplanets found

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

Two systems in the cosmic realm that are the closest to Earth found so far. At half the speed of light we can visit them within a single human lifetime.... Read more »

Anglada-Escude, G., Arriagada, P., Tuomi, M., Zechmeister, M., Jenkins, J., Ofir, A., Dreizler, S., Gerlach, E., Marvin, C., Reiners, A.... (2014) Two planets around Kapteyn's star: a cold and a temperate super-Earth orbiting the nearest halo red dwarf. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, 443(1). DOI: 10.1093/mnrasl/slu076  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 5 views

We agree and thus, I am certain we shall prevail

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) here. THANKS! […]

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  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:59 AM
  • 52 views

Efficient Room-Temperature Phosphorescent OLEDs Developed

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

The team of Jinsang Kim, a professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, developed bright, metal-free, organic, phosphorescent light emitters.... Read more »

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