Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

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The mission of SMR is to objectively summarize and describe the clinical relevance of research articles related to basic science, translational research, and clinical research that may be relevant to students and professionals interested in sports medicine. Furthermore, SMR aims to provide a forum for clinicians, researchers, and students in sports medicine-related fields to discuss the clinical relevance of new research.

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  • April 16, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 64 views

Knees with an ACL Reconstruction Often Have Osteoarthritis Regardless of Graft Selection

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Knees with a history of an anterior cruciate ligament injury are more likely to have osteoarthritis compared with a healthy contralateral knee but graft selection has no effect on long-term outcomes, such as osteoarthritis or knee functional outcomes.... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 81 views

Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement

by Meghan Maume Miller in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Diagnosing labral tears with femoroacetabular impingement can be slow and expensive, it is important for health care professionals to quickly recognize and manage the symptoms.... Read more »

Kahlenberg, C., Han, B., Patel, R., Deshmane, P., & Terry, M. (2014) Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(3). DOI: 10.1177/2325967114523916  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 119 views

Can Biochemical Markers in the Blood Detect Concussions?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Biochemical markers in the blood, like T-tau, are elevated after a concussion and are associated with recovery time. These markers may eventually be developed into clinical tools to determine diagnosis and prognosis after concussions as well as to devise improved return-to-play decisions.... Read more »

Shahim, P., Tegner, Y., Wilson, D., Randall, J., Skillbäck, T., Pazooki, D., Kallberg, B., Blennow, K., & Zetterberg, H. (2014) Blood Biomarkers for Brain Injury in Concussed Professional Ice Hockey Players. JAMA Neurology. DOI: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.367  

  • April 7, 2014
  • 12:02 AM
  • 100 views

Causes and Incidence of Sudden Death Among College Athletes

by Marc Harwood in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Two recent studies found different causes of SCD, which makes it difficult to develop cost-effective screening strategies when it remains uncertain what problems we should be screening for in preparticipation physicals.... Read more »

Harmon, K., Drezner, J., Maleszewski, J., Lopez-Anderson, M., Owens, D., Prutkin, J., Asif, I., Klossner, D., & Ackerman, M. (2014) Etiologies of Sudden Cardiac Death in National Collegiate Athletic Association Athletes. Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCEP.113.001376  

Maron, B., Haas, T., Murphy, C., Ahluwalia, A., & Rutten-Ramos, S. (2014) Incidence and Causes of Sudden Death in U.S. College Athletes. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.01.041  

  • April 2, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 66 views

Cam Deformities Develop During Growth

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Cam deformities develop over time in skeletally immature elite soccer athletes.
... Read more »

  • March 31, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 73 views

The Effectiveness of Computerized Neurocognitive Testing

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Computerized neurocognitive testing results suggest athletes suffer small impairments within one week of a concussion. Several factors may lead to more pronounced impairments: age, type of neurocognitive test, and test administrator.... Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 97 views

A Novel Rehabilitation Program To Improve Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome Outcomes

by Neal Glaviano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A rehabilitation program that uses hip and trunk strengthening with verbal feedback and proper instruction during rehab provided greater pain reduction, improved strength, and improved squatting mechanics compared with a standard rehabilitation program that was focused on quadriceps strengthening.... Read more »

  • March 26, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 102 views

Athletic Training Students’ Perceived Lack of Respect Causes Frustration during Clinical Experiences

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletic training students, who are involved in clinical experiences, report the highest levels of frustration when they experience a lack of respect from coaches, athletes, and their preceptors. They also experience frustration trying to balance their clinical experience with other obligations.... Read more »

  • March 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 96 views

Fixed or Failed Cuff Repair: What Difference Does it Make?

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Patients who underwent rotator cuff repair have improved function and reduced pain, regardless of the structural integrity of the repair. Patients with an intact repair have greater strength than those with retears.... Read more »

  • March 19, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 113 views

ACL Risk – It’s In Your Genes

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Individuals with a history of an anterior cruciate ligament injury are more likely to have certain genetic variations compared with individuals without a history of a knee injury. While these findings are novel and interesting, researchers need to conduct more research to understand the multifactorial genetic risk behind anterior cruciate ligament injuries. ... Read more »

Mannion, S., Mtintsilana, A., Posthumus, M., van der Merwe, W., Hobbs, H., Collins, M., & September, A. (2014) Genes encoding proteoglycans are associated with the risk of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. British Journal of Sports Medicine. DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093201  

  • March 17, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 96 views

Illegal Collision Tackles in Rugby Causes More Injuries

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Take Home Message: Illegal collision tackles cause the most injuries per contact and weeks missed due to injury. Six percent of scrums, a relatively controllable event, collapse; however, the propensity for injury is 4 times higher and the severity is 6 times greater than non-collapsed scrums.
... Read more »

Roberts SP, Trewartha G, England M, & Stokes KA. (2014) Collapsed scrums and collision tackles: what is the injury risk?. British Journal of Sports Medicine. PMID: 24516009  

  • March 12, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 97 views

Knee Injuries Sustained Prior to Collegiate Athletics may be a Factor in Identifying Athletes at Risk for Reinjury

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

College athletes who had orthopaedic surgery in high school miss more days of collegiate competition than athletes without a history of orthopaedic surgery. More specifically, athletes with a history of knee surgery were more likely to sustain another knee injury or require surgery while in college.... Read more »

  • March 5, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 131 views

ACL Autograft Selection Revisited

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision is relatively low after an autograft reconstruction. Revision rates may be slightly lower for patellar autografts compared with hamstring autografts.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 115 views

Smaller Groups and More Supervision May Be Necessary for Baseline Testing in Younger Athletes

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Younger athletes (10-12 year olds) have more invalid baseline ImPACT exams compared to older athletes (13-18 year olds). This is most pronounced when younger athletes are tested in large groups in a nonclinical setting.... Read more »

  • February 26, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 120 views

Cardiovascular Screening Practices in College Athletics has Room for Improvement

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

While many screening methods for sudden cardiac death exist, a large proportion of institutions do not employ noninvasive cardiac screening. The most commonly reported reasons why noninvasive cardiac screening is not used was lack of evidence to support its effectiveness and cost.... Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 144 views

Riddell Revolution Helmet and Concussion Risk Reduction?

by Stephen Stache, MD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

When compared to the older Riddell VSR4 model helmet, college football players wearing the Riddell Revolution helmet may have a lower risk of concussion.... Read more »

Rowson S, Duma SM, Greenwald RM, Beckwith JG, Chu JJ, Guskiewicz KM, Mihalik JP, Crisco JJ, Wilcox BJ, McAllister TW.... (2014) Can helmet design reduce the risk of concussion in football?. Journal of Neurosurgery. PMID: 24484225  

  • February 20, 2014
  • 12:08 AM
  • 154 views

Hip Strengthening Better than Quads for Patellofemoral Pain

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Eight-week strengthening programs that address the posterolateral hip muscles or quadriceps improve patellofemoral pain for up to 6 months. The outcomes were better for the posterolateral hip strengthening group. ... Read more »

  • February 18, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 139 views

Youth Soccer Girls Heading Up in the Concussion Rates

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Young female soccer players (11 to 14 years) have a high rate of concussions, often continue to play with symptoms, and commonly fail to seek medical attention.... Read more »

O'Kane JW, Spieker A, Levy MR, Neradilek M, Polissar NL, & Schiff MA. (2014) Concussion Among Female Middle-School Soccer Players. JAMA pediatrics. PMID: 24446018  

  • February 12, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 139 views

Exertional Heat Stroke Management Still Has Something to be Desired

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Many athletes especially football players suffer exertional heat stroke each year To reduce the prevalence of exertional heat stroke, clinicians should be well educated on, and implement active exertional heat stroke management strategies such as moving the athletes into air conditioning, cold water immersion, and monitoring body temperature.... Read more »

Kerr ZY, Marshall SW, Comstock RD, & Casa DJ. (2014) Exertional heat stroke management strategies in United States high school football. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(1), 70-7. PMID: 24013346  

  • February 6, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 163 views

To Brace or Not to Brace…That is the Question

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Long-term bracing reduced the incidence of recurrent ankle sprains in comparison with 12 weeks of neuromuscular training following an ankle sprain. A combination of bracing and neuromuscular training also had a mild reduction in comparison with neuromuscular training. ... Read more »

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