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  • March 18, 2015
  • 06:43 PM
  • 76 views

How alien cell membranes could form in methane seas

by This Science is Crazy in This Science Is Crazy!

Scientist identify 'azotosomes' - short carbon chains with a nitrogen terminus native to the atmosphere of Titan which can potentially self-assemble into bilayers in liquid methane.... Read more »

  • March 16, 2015
  • 02:03 AM
  • 63 views

Life on places other than the Earth

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

“Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying” (Arthur C. Clarke)

Life on Earth is a common thing. Life on clouds and in water looks interesting. And life on places other than the Earth (extraterrestrial life) looks…ummmm…possible. In this article, I will try to note some information ranging from hypothesis to scientific information related to the life on places other than Earth.


The Drake Equation

In........ Read more »

McKay, C., Anbar, A., Porco, C., & Tsou, P. (2014) Follow the Plume: The Habitability of Enceladus. Astrobiology, 14(4), 352-355. DOI: 10.1089/ast.2014.1158  

  • February 28, 2015
  • 02:46 PM
  • 166 views

Life, NOT as we know it

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Life as we know it, when we peer deep into the vastness of space we look for someone — or something — that resembles ourselves. Carbon based, needs water lifeforms, but what if we’re being narrow-minded? A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled by a team of researchers suggests we are being too closed minded about life.... Read more »

James Stevenson,, Jonathan Lunine,, & Paulette Clancy. (2015) Membrane alternatives in worlds without oxygen: Creation of an azotosome. Science Advances. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1400067

  • February 13, 2015
  • 03:36 PM
  • 157 views

Interstellar helps physicists research spinning black holes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a saying that life imitates art and while people like to disagree with the meaning of it, sometimes art can imitate life. For instance the team responsible for the Oscar-nominated visual effects at the centre of Interstellar, have turned science fiction into science fact by providing new insights into the powerful effects of black holes.... Read more »

Oliver James, Eugenie von Tunzelmann, Paul Franklin, & Kip S. Thorne. (2015) Gravitational Lensing by Spinning Black Holes in Astrophysics, and in the Movie Interstellar. Classical and Quantum Gravity. arXiv: 1502.03808v1

  • January 31, 2015
  • 03:02 PM
  • 224 views

New theory tries to define where black holes don’t exist

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The quintessential feature of a black hole is its “point of no return,” or what is more technically called its event horizon, yes just like the movie. When anything—a star, a particle, or wayward human—crosses this horizon, the black hole’s massive gravity pulls it in with such force that it is impossible to escape. At least, this is what happens in traditional black hole models based on general relativity. In general, the existence of this event horizon is responsible for most of the ........ Read more »

  • January 21, 2015
  • 07:24 AM
  • 189 views

Space Exploration 2.0

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Redefining space exploration: SpaceX's crazy week in the private space race. [Infographic]... Read more »

  • January 2, 2015
  • 10:32 AM
  • 289 views

Raindrops Are like Tiny Asteroid Strikes

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Rainshowers are a lot more dramatic if you imagine every drop is a tiny asteroid imperiling miniature dinosaurs or sending little astronaut Ben Afflecks into space. It turns out your fantasy wouldn't be that far off, aside from that last part. Researchers have found startling similarities between asteroid craters and the fleeting indentations left by raindrops on sand.

At the University of Minnesota, physicist Xiang Cheng and three undergraduate students scrutinized what happens when a dr... Read more »

Runchen Zhao, Qianyun Zhang, Hendro Tjugito, & Xiang Cheng. (2014) Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. arXiv: 1407.7420v2

  • December 4, 2014
  • 02:21 PM
  • 309 views

ALMA Japan: Hi-Def Imaging of Spiral Gas Arms from Twin Baby Stars (w/video)

by DJ Busby in Astronasty

We know that about half the the stars out there (with sizes close to that of our sun) are binary systems. However, for a long time we've been lacking information on how they develop, since it's not been easy to get a whole lot of data from surrounding scattered mass that's so damned far away! Congrats to all involved!... Read more »

Shigehisa Takakuwa, Masao Saito, Kazuya Saigo, Tomoaki Matsumoto, Jeremy Lim, Tomoyuki Hanawa, & Paul T. P. Ho. (2014) Angular Momentum Exchange by Gravitational Torques and Infall in the Circumbinary Disk of the Protostellar System L1551 NE. The Astrophysical Journal. arXiv: 1409.4903v1

  • December 3, 2014
  • 02:58 AM
  • 296 views

5 Best Places To Look For Life Outside Earth

by jeffrey daniels in United Academics

Where in our Solar System most of the ingredients for life have been found, and thus stand a good chance of harbouring life that evolved completely separate from Earth?... Read more »

McKay, C. (2010) An Origin of Life on Mars. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology, 2(4). DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a003509  

Waite JH Jr, Combi MR, Ip WH, Cravens TE, McNutt RL Jr, Kasprzak W, Yelle R, Luhmann J, Niemann H, Gell D.... (2006) Cassini ion and neutral mass spectrometer: Enceladus plume composition and structure. Science (New York, N.Y.), 311(5766), 1419-22. PMID: 16527970  

Iess L, Stevenson DJ, Parisi M, Hemingway D, Jacobson RA, Lunine JI, Nimmo F, Armstrong JW, Asmar SW, Ducci M.... (2014) The gravity field and interior structure of Enceladus. Science (New York, N.Y.), 344(6179), 78-80. PMID: 24700854  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 10:50 AM
  • 372 views

A Four Billion Mile Road Trip to Grandma’s

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

Mankind is about to take a huge step in understanding himself and his universe. The Rosetta orbiter has traveled 3.8 billion miles to catch comet 67P/C-G. Traveling at more than 24,000 miles per hour, the Philae Lander is now going to land on the comet. A visitor from deep space and from deep time, 67P/C-G contains clues about the solar system, water, and perhaps life itself.... Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 04:50 PM
  • 396 views

A Venusian Mystery Explored Once More

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Venus, the place where women are from... supposedly. To say Venus has a harsh climate would be an understatement, this is one of many reasons why we will never (or maybe not soon) see a "long lasting" Venus rover counterpart to our Mars rover missions. Still, the planet (much like all the other plants) can teach us a lot about not just our own origins, but the origins of the universe. Also like all our neighbor planets Venus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds, a mystery t........ Read more »

Harrington, E. et. Al. (2014) The puzzle of radar-bright highlands on venus: a high-spatial resolution study in Ovda regio. Geological Society of America. info:other/136-4

  • September 27, 2014
  • 01:29 PM
  • 496 views

Are Black Holes just in Our Imagination?!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Black holes, physicists have been fighting over them forever, heck there is even a book entitled the black hole war! (which I do recommend for anyone interested) It’s no real surprise since they are the ultimate unknown – the blackest and most dense objects in the universe that do not even let light escape. And as if they weren't bizarre enough to begin with, now add this to the mix: they don’t exist.... Read more »

Laura Mersini-Houghton, Harald P. Pfeiffer. (2014) Back-reaction of the Hawking radiation flux on a gravitationally collapsing star II: Fireworks instead of firewalls . Physics Letters B. info:/arXiv:1409.1837

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 527 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2014
  • 06:15 PM
  • 541 views

Does the motion of the solar system affect our climate?

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

The solar system is believed to vertically oscillate relative to the galactic disc. A new study analyses proxy-climate data to establish a link between the galactic cycle and climate.... Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 05:50 AM
  • 436 views

Nature’s Magnifying Glass: Gravitational Lensing

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

Gravitational lensing is a clean probe of the Universe and has much to tell us about its two most mysterious components – dark matter and dark energy. This article explains what it is, what is can discover and what Sherlock Holmes has to do with it.... Read more »

Kenneth C. Wong, Kim-Vy H. Tran, Sherry H. Suyu, Ivelina G. Momcheva, Gabriel B. Brammer, Mark Brodwin, Anthony H. Gonzalez, Aleksi Halkola, Glenn G. Kacprzak, Anton M. Koekemoer.... (2014) Discovery of a Strong Lensing Galaxy Embedded in a Cluster at z . The Astrophysical Journal Letters vol. 789 . arXiv: 1405.3661v2

  • July 23, 2014
  • 01:21 PM
  • 554 views

Voyager has hit interstellar space…. maybe?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Poor Voyager, he just can’t catch a break. We’ve said it’s hit interstellar space more times than we want to admit and in 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that […]... Read more »

G. Gloeckler, & L. A. Fisk. (2014) A test for whether or not Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/10.1002/2014GL060781

  • June 5, 2014
  • 12:03 PM
  • 611 views

The Surprisingly Magnetic Black Hole

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Black holes suck. Nothing can escape a black hole, not even light, which is why they are “black”. They are also an interesting bit of physics. Normally “classical” physics applies […]... Read more »

Zamaninasab, M., Clausen-Brown, E., Savolainen, T., & Tchekhovskoy, A. (2014) Dynamically important magnetic fields near accreting supermassive black holes. Nature, 510(7503), 126-128. DOI: 10.1038/nature13399  

S. W. Hawking. (2014) Information Preservation and Weather Forecasting for Black Holes. Cornell University Library . arXiv: 1401.5761v1

  • May 10, 2014
  • 07:54 AM
  • 627 views

How lessons from space put the greenhouse effect on the front page

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

Interest in atmospheres of outer planets took Jim Hansen from Iowa to NASA, where he came to realise that humans adding CO2 to Earth’s atmosphere would lead to an unprecedented warming, and brought that fact to the world’s attention.... Read more »

Somerville, R.C.J., P.H. Stone, M. Halem, J.E. Hansen, J.S. Hogan, L.M. Druyan, G. Russell, A.A. Lacis, W.J. Quirk, and J. Tenenbaum. (1974) The GISS model of the global atmosphere. J. Atmos. Sci. DOI: 10.1007/BFb0019776  

Hansen, J., Johnson, D., Lacis, A., Lebedeff, S., Lee, P., Rind, D., & Russell, G. (1981) Climate Impact of Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide. Science, 213(4511), 957-966. DOI: 10.1126/science.213.4511.957  

Rasool, S. (1983) On predicting calamities. Climatic Change, 5(2), 201-202. DOI: 10.1007/BF00141271  

  • May 2, 2014
  • 04:03 AM
  • 970 views

Entire Star Cluster Thrown Out of its Galaxy

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

The galaxy known as M87 has a fastball that would be the envy of any baseball pitcher. It has thrown an entire star cluster toward us at more than two million miles per hour. The newly discovered cluster, which astronomers named HVGC-1, is now on a fast journey to nowhere. Its fate: to drift through the void between the galaxies for all time.

News release April 30, 2014 HARVARD-SMITHSONIAN CENTER FOR ASTROPHYSICS... Read more »

Nelson Caldwell, Jay Strader, Aaron J. Romanowsky, Jean P. Brodie, Ben Moore, Jurg Diemand, & Davide Martizzi. (2014) A Globular Cluster Toward M87 with a Radial Velocity . Cornell University Library. arXiv: 1402.6319v2

  • May 1, 2014
  • 03:45 PM
  • 783 views

Shockwave findings set to rewrite scientific theories

by Perikis Livas in Tracing Knowledge

For the first time an international team of astronomers has measured circular polarisation in the bright flash of light from a dying star collapsing to a black hole, giving insight into an event that happened almost 11 billion years ago.

New insights into gamma-ray Burst afterglows-Niels Bohr Institute University of Copenhagen

Astronomers observe corkscrew nature of light from a distant black hole - Curtin University

Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts afterglow surprises scientists -University o........ Read more »

Wiersema, K., Covino, S., Toma, K., van der Horst, A., Varela, K., Min, M., Greiner, J., Starling, R., Tanvir, N., Wijers, R.... (2014) Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature13237  

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