Post List

Social Science posts

(Modify Search »)

  • November 21, 2014
  • 06:39 PM
  • 2 views

Dogtober = Canine science in October

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

What a BOOMING month for dogs and science October was! We've captured the links to all the latest blogs, research and news that caught out attention throughout Dog-tober.Thanks to Storify (click here if the you can't see the collection of links below) you can make sure you didn't miss out too.[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-31 October 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Bradshaw J.W.S. & Nicola J. Rooney (2014). Why do adult dogs ‘play’?, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http:/........ Read more »

Bozkurt Alper, Barbara Sherman, Rita Brugarolas, Sean Mealin, John Majikes, Pu Yang, & Robert Loftin. (2014) Towards Cyber-Enhanced Working Dogs for Search and Rescue. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 1-1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/mis.2014.77  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 17 views

The “euphemism treadmill”: Is it African-American or Black?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It’s a constantly moving target. Just over a year ago, we wrote about this on-going question and cited a Gallup Poll saying 65% of Black Americans have no preference when it comes to labels used to describe their racial or ethnic group. The authors of today’s research article would disagree. They say there are consequences […]

Related posts:
Should we say Black or African-American? Latino or Hispanic?
Everyday racism: A comparison of African American and Asian American Women
Are you........ Read more »

Hall, EV, Phillips, KW, & Townsend, SSM. (2014) A rose by any other name? The consequences of subtyping “African-Americans” from “Blacks”. . Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. . info:/

  • November 18, 2014
  • 09:29 PM
  • 59 views

Is There Such a Thing as ‘Facebook Murder’?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

Investigators recently set out to consider whether homicides involving social networking sites were unique and worthy of labels such as ‘Facebook Murder’, and to explore the ways in which perpetrators had used such sites in the homicides they had committed.

The cases they identified were not collectively unique or unusual when compared with general trends and characteristics—certainly not to a degree that would necessitate the introduction of a new category of homicide or a ........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 71 views

Does brain training really work?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever wonder if you could be the next Einstein if only you could do some brain training? Well as it turns out, while computer based ‘brain training’ can boost memory and thinking skills in older adults, many programs promoted by the $1 billion brain training industry are ineffective.... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 01:15 PM
  • 56 views

From H. pylori to Spanish colonialism: the scales of cancer.

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Yesterday was the first day of the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop here at Moffitt. This year, it is run jointly with the Center for Infection Research in Cancer and is thus focused on the interaction of infection disease and cancer. This is a topic that I have not focused much attention on — except […]... Read more »

Kodaman, N., Pazos, A., Schneider, B.G., Piazuelo, M.B., Mera, R., Sobota, R.S., Sicinschi, L.A., Shaffer, C.L., Romero-Gallo, J., de Sablet, T.... (2014) Human and Helicobacter pylori coevolution shapes the risk of gastric disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(4), 1455-60. PMID: 24474772  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 12:01 PM
  • 67 views

Social Effectiveness Therapy Beats Social Anxiety, Study Shows

by Simon Moesgaard-Kjeldsen in Reflectd

A new randomized controlled trial shows promising results for the treatment of social anxiety disorder.... Read more »

Beidel, D., Alfano, C., Kofler, M., Rao, P., Scharfstein, L., & Wong Sarver, N. (2014) The impact of social skills training for social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 28(8), 908-918. DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.09.016  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 08:05 PM
  • 59 views

Canine science catch up: 16-30 September 2014

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Gosh, it's been a busy ride since posting the excellent guest post by research, Cat Reeve, about her interesting detector dog research.  So now it's time to play catch up, starting with the canine science related things that we noticed in the second half of September, captured with the help of Storify - did you miss any of these?[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16 - 30 September 2014]" on Storify]Further reading (some of the abstracts from Canine Science Forum 2014 now available):We........ Read more »

Westgarth Carri, & Hayley E. Christian. (2014) How can we motivate owners to walk their dogs more?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.023  

Horowitz Alexandra, & Hecht Julie . (2014) Categories and consequences of dog-human play: A citizen science approach. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.052  

Browne Clare M., T. Mary Foster, & James S. McEwan. (2014) Dog training: Reinforcement timing and owner body language. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.059  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 69 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 02:43 AM
  • 72 views

Bilingual students at the crossroads

by Livia Gerber in Language on the Move

Secondary education as a monolingual fork in the road Let me bust a prevalent urban myth: You do not need to be bi- or multilingual to become a linguist. There, busted. In fact, being bilingual initially brought me to a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 07:28 AM
  • 138 views

How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The words you use in your Facebook profile reveal much about your personality, according to psychologists Gregory Park and colleagues in a new study just published. Based on a study of 71,000 Facebook users who reported their personality using an app, Park et al. found some quite unexpected words to be associated with given personality […]The post How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Park G, Schwartz HA, Eichstaedt JC, Kern ML, Kosinski M, Stillwell DJ, Ungar LH, & Seligman ME. (2014) Automatic Personality Assessment Through Social Media Language. Journal of personality and social psychology. PMID: 25365036  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 07:20 PM
  • 95 views

Evolutionary Sins: The Gender Gap In Spatial Cognition And Navigation

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Recent research based on the Twe and Tjimba people of northwestern Namibia is suggested to lend evidence that gender gaps in spatial cognition are a result of evolutionary pressures, as men with higher spatial cognition are more successful in these tribes at mating and producing offspring. This post examines the literature and comes to a different conclusion, warning against hasty evolutionary explanations for behavioural traits.... Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 05:28 PM
  • 57 views

Hard times, tough gods

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Almost all cultures have some kind of supernatural beliefs. But it may surprise you to know that belief in moralising supernatural beings, who care about whether mortals do good or bad, are far from universal. That’s fascinating, and it begs the question: “why?”. Why do some cultures bother to believe spirits who watch over us [Read More...]

... Read more »

Botero CA, Gardner B, Kirby KR, Bulbulia J, Gavin MC, & Gray RD. (2014) The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25385605  

  • November 13, 2014
  • 02:01 PM
  • 66 views

25 Years after the Fall of Berlin Wall

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

For 28 years, the Berlin Wall stood as a physical reminder of the Cold War's destruction of civil liberties and a barrier against reconstruction. On November 9, 1989, the world anxiously awaited as Berliners gathered to dismantle the wall that separated families, economies, and opportunities.... Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 09:19 AM
  • 83 views

Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

“Certification programs have their merits and their limitations. With the growing availability of social media, analytics tools, and supply chain data, a smarter set of solutions could soon be possible”, as Robert Handfield and I argue in our paper, just published in Supply Chain Management Review. We believe that an evolution from company thinking to […]... Read more »

Wieland, A., & Handfield, R.B. (2014) The Challenge of Ensuring Human Rights in the End-to-End Supply Chain. Supply Chain Management Review, 18(6), 49-51. info:/

  • November 11, 2014
  • 09:34 PM
  • 261 views

Video Gaming and Internet Addiction : Harmful or Harmless?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

The more the addiction to video games, Internet and social media is increased among teenagers and young adults, the more concerned the parents become. It is where family therapists play an important role. Are video games really bad for children? How to counter addiction to social media? Researchers explored the impact for these new forms of entertainment to assist family therapists.

When researchers compared two groups of players who played massive multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORP........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 03:57 PM
  • 63 views

A new way to look at Global Warming

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Global warming, nothing new with that and it’s here to stay for now. But while computer models churn out bleak forecasts for the planet’s future, we also have a more conceptual understanding of what is happening as humans pump carbon dioxide into the air. Unfortunately the traditional conceptual understanding of carbon dioxide wrapping the planet in a sort of blanket that traps more heat is not quite right.... Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 64 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “halo of scientific validity” effect

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about the lack of evidence for the much-feared “CSI Effect”. But here’s an interesting study about the simple “appearance of science” as opposed to the bells and whistles of high-tech “CSI”-like evidence. All it takes is the use of “scientese” (scientific sounding words)–not to be confused with “lawyerese” (which we wrote about here […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
Simple Jury Persuasi........ Read more »

  • November 9, 2014
  • 12:48 PM
  • 100 views

If being sad is “bad”, then why is there sad music?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We tell children not to look so sad. We tell adults to wipe that sad look off their face and smile. We even worry that if you are sad too long, you might need medical attention. Yet, for most of us, when life gets you down, you put on some sad music. So if sadness is such a negative, why do we spend our money and time wallowing in these sad tunes?... Read more »

  • November 8, 2014
  • 12:55 PM
  • 96 views

When it comes to sleep recommendations, what about the children?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Sleep is a hot topic lately, are we getting too much, too little, how much is enough? However, most of these questions are for adults, so what about children? Well as it turns out a new study used activity monitors to track how sleep habits changed in younger and older teens as they grew during a two-year period. Key findings from this study has also lent t0 new support to recent recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics that middle and high schools avoid starting earlier than 8:30 a........ Read more »

  • November 7, 2014
  • 07:39 PM
  • 113 views

Friends with Benefits

by Abena Edugyan in Your Active Edge

Two studies that look at motivation and physical activity. ... Read more »

Janssen, I., Dugan, S., Karavolos, K., Lynch, E., & Powell, L. (2013) Correlates of 15-Year Maintenance of Physical Activity in Middle-Aged Women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine., 21(3), 511-518. DOI: 10.1007/s12529-013-9324-z  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.