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Highlights, discusses and critiques the science of conservation that has demonstrated measurable, positive effects for global biodiversity.

CJA Bradshaw
53 posts

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  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 818 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 725 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 780 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • May 19, 2011
  • 01:11 AM
  • 805 views

Over-estimating extinction rates

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

I meant to get this out yesterday, but was too hamstrung with other commitments. Now the media circus has beat me to the punch. Despite the lateness (in news-time) of my post, my familiarity with the analysis and the people involved gives me a unique insight, I believe. So a couple of months ago, Fangliang He and [...]... Read more »

  • April 13, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 1,882 views

Getting conservation stakeholders involved

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another guest post from another switched-on Queensland student, Duan Biggs. Duan, originally from Namibia and South Africa, is doing his PhD at the ARC Centre for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland. His PhD is investigating the resilience of nature-based tourism to climate change. I’ve met Duan a few times, and [...]... Read more »

  • March 15, 2011
  • 12:30 PM
  • 1,316 views

Classics: demography versus genetics

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another short, but sweet Conservation Classic highlighted in our upcoming book chapter (see previous entries on this book). Today’s entry comes from long-time quantitative ecology guru, Russ Lande, who is now based at the Silwood Park Campus (Imperial College London). – In an influential review, Lande (1988) argued that “…demography may usually be of more [...]... Read more »

  • February 27, 2011
  • 08:15 PM
  • 942 views

Classics: Tragedy of the Commons

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Another one from our upcoming chapter in the book ‘Biodiversity’ to be published later this year by InTech. – Although not a conservation biology paper per se, Hardin’s classic essay (Hardin, 1968) changed the way we think about managing natural resources that lack definitive ownership. The thesis of the “tragedy of the commons” is that [...]... Read more »

Hardin, G. (1968) The Tragedy of the Commons. Science, 162(3859), 1243-1248. DOI: 10.1126/science.162.3859.1243  

  • February 13, 2011
  • 11:30 PM
  • 1,171 views

Classics: Shifting baselines

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

The Conservation Classics series will soon be collated and published in a special chapter for the book ‘Biodiversity’ to be published later this year by InTech. The chapter is co-authored by Barry Brook, Navjot Sodhi, Bill Laurance and me. This is a snippet of one ‘classic’ I haven’t yet really covered extensively on ConservationBytes.com. – [...]... Read more »

  • February 2, 2011
  • 07:20 PM
  • 1,441 views

Colour-blind sharks

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

A few weeks ago I was interviewed on Channel 10 (Adelaide) about some new research coming out of the University of Western Australia regarding shark colour vision. I’ve received permission from Channel 1o to reproduce the news snippet here. The first bloke interviewed is Associate Professor Nathan Hart, the study‘s lead author. I’m the bald [...]... Read more »

  • January 30, 2011
  • 07:43 PM
  • 974 views

When weeds are wanted

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

And in keeping with the topic of bees… – I’ve just read a very, very cool paper in Ecology Letters about something I’ve wanted to do myself for some time. It’s a fairly specific piece of work, so it could easily be reproduced elsewhere with different species. My point though is that a hell of [...]... Read more »

Carvalheiro, L., Veldtman, R., Shenkute, A., Tesfay, G., Pirk, C., Donaldson, J., & Nicolson, S. (2011) Natural and within-farmland biodiversity enhances crop productivity. Ecology Letters. DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01579.x  

  • January 8, 2011
  • 01:07 AM
  • 976 views

S.A.F.E. = Species Ability to Forestall Extinction

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

I’ve been more or less underground for the last 3 weeks. It has been a wonderful break (mostly) from the normally hectic pace of academic life. Thanks for all those who remain despite the recent silence. – But I’m back now with a post about a paper we’ve just had accepted in Frontiers in Ecology [...]... Read more »

  • December 4, 2010
  • 03:44 AM
  • 913 views

Conservation is all about prioritisation

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Another great guest post from a previous contributor, Piero Visconti. – Biodiversity conservation is about prioritisation – making difficult choices. With limited money and so many habitats and species in need of protection, deciding where not to expend resources is as important as deciding where to act. Saying ‘no’ will be crucial for ensuring the [...]... Read more »

  • October 15, 2010
  • 09:31 AM
  • 633 views

Blog Action Day 2010 – Water neutrality and its biodiversity benefits

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

In my little bid to participate in Change.org’s Blog Action Day 2010 – Water, I’ve re-hashed a post from 2008 on ‘water neutrality’. This will also benefit my recently joined readers, and re-invigorate a concept I don’t think has received nearly enough attention globally (or even in parched Australia where I live). So here we [...]... Read more »

  • September 26, 2010
  • 10:59 PM
  • 634 views

Humans 1, Environment 0

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

While travelling to our Supercharge Your Science workshop in Cairns and Townsville last week (which, by the way, went off really well and the punters gave us the thumbs up – stay tuned for more Supercharge activities at a university near you…), I stumbled across an article in the Sydney Morning Herald about the state [...]... Read more »

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2010) Measures of Australia's Progress. Report. info:other/

Raudsepp-Hearne, C., Peterson, G., Tengö, M., Bennett, E., Holland, T., Benessaiah, K., MacDonald, G., & Pfeifer, L. (2010) Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why Is Human Well-being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade?. BioScience, 60(8), 576-589. DOI: 10.1525/bio.2010.60.8.4  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 03:51 AM
  • 996 views

The lost world – freshwater biodiversity conservation

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Even the most obtuse, right-wing, head-in-the-sand, consumption-driven, anti-environment yob would at least admit that they’ve heard of forest conservation, the plight of whales (more on that little waste of conservation resources later) and climate change. Whether or not they believe these issues are important (or even occurring) is beside the point – the fact that [...]... Read more »

  • August 23, 2010
  • 11:10 AM
  • 915 views

Long, deep and broad

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Thought that would get your attention ;-) “More scientists need to be trained in quantitative synthesis, visualization and other software tools.” D. Peters (2010) In fact, that is part of the title of today’s focus paper in Trends in Ecology and Evolution by D. Peters – Accessible ecology: synthesis of the long, deep,and broad. As a [...]... Read more »

  • August 12, 2010
  • 11:27 AM
  • 1,104 views

Marine protected areas: do they work?

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

“One measure that often meets great resistance from fishermen, but is beloved by conservationists, is the establishment of marine protected or ‘no take’ areas.” Stephen J. Hall (1998) I’m going to qualify this particular post with a few disclaimers; first, I am not involved in the planning of any marine protected areas (henceforth referred to [...]... Read more »

Stewart, G., Kaiser, M., Côté, I., Halpern, B., Lester, S., Bayliss, H., & Pullin, A. (2009) Temperate marine reserves: global ecological effects and guidelines for future networks. Conservation Letters, 2(6), 243-253. DOI: 10.1111/j.1755-263X.2009.00074.x  

  • July 21, 2010
  • 12:45 AM
  • 942 views

Conservation research rarely equals conservation

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

I am currently attending the 2010 International Meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) in Sanur, Bali (Indonesia). As I did a few weeks ago at the ICCB in Canada, I’m tweeting and blogging my way through. - Yesterday I attended a talk by my good friend Trish Shanley (formerly of CIFOR) [...]... Read more »

  • July 6, 2010
  • 09:36 AM
  • 1,106 views

Killing us slowly

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

I’m currently attending the 2010 International Congress for Conservation Biology in Edmonton, Canada. I thought it would be good to tweet and blog my way through on topics that catch my attention. This is my second post from the conference. – I silently scoffed inside when the plenary speaker was being introduced. It was boldly claimed that [...]... Read more »

  • July 2, 2010
  • 12:03 AM
  • 1,106 views

Put the bite back into biodiversity conservation

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Today’s guest post is by Dr. Euan Ritchie, formerly of James Cook University, but who is now firmly entrenched at Deakin University in Victoria as a new Lecturer in ecology. Euan’s exciting research over the course of his memorable PhD (under the tutelage of renowned ecologist-guru, Professor Chris Johnson) has produced some whoppingly high-impact research. [...]... Read more »

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